Facets of a Muse

Examining the guiding genius of writers everywhere

British English Translated

3 Comments

So funny! Thank you, Nicholas, for sharing these! Reminds me of Minnesotan (seriously! There’s even a book on How to Talk Minnesotan) in the understatement department. Really. I’m sure it’ll all be fine 🙂

Nicholas C. Rossis

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image: f3.quomodo.com/

As you may remember, I spent many of my formative years in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. One of the first things I realized upon arriving to that fair city was that speaking English for years in Greece had not prepared me for the thrill of actually communicating with the natives. Specifically, I was caught unawares of the wonderful nuances that make all the difference.

“How are you today?” I’d ask my fellow students.

“Aye, not too bad, actually” they’d reply.

“Why, what’s wrong?” I’d ask, clueless to the fact that this is a Scotsman’s understated way of saying, “I’m the happiest I’ve ever been.”

So, when I found a hilarious post on The Idealist Revolution website on the subject, I just had to share as a helpful guide to my American friends, anyone setting their scenes in the UK and anyone wanting to visit…

British English Translated: what they say and what it means

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Author: Julie Holmes, author

Pen name: J. M. Goebel A fiction writer since elementary school (many years ago), and NaNoWriMo annual participant for a decade, I've been published in small press magazines such as "Fighting Chance" and "The Galactic Citizen". Currently I have two polished novels ready for the world and a number of others waiting their turn. I write adult mystery with extrasensory elements, mystery with a touch of romance, contemporary fantasy, and epic fantasy. In real life, I am a technical writer with a family of two teens, a wonderful hubby, one cat (what writer doesn't have cats??), two dogs, four chickens, and more chipmunks, squirrels, and rabbits than any garden should have to deal with. My garden, our "au natural" hobby farm, and Ma Nature's annual seasons are some of my muses.

3 thoughts on “British English Translated

  1. Now I have to check out “How to Talk Minnesotan” 😀

    Thank you so much for sharing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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