Facets of a Muse

Examining the guiding genius of writers everywhere


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Time, where did you go?

Image by Ronny Overhate from Pixabay

Have you looked at the calendar lately? I thought we just finished Halloween, and now, in a week and a half, it will be Christmas.

Let that sink in for a minute.

Granted, Turkey Day was late this year, but still. I have to keep reminding myself there’s only one more week before Christmas. And guess what? I haven’t even started my shopping, much less finished it.

I’m almost finished with my draft of Book 2, but with the kids coming home for winter break, I’ll have to adjust my expectations of writing time and energy.

I know a lot of writers put their writing on “pause” during this time of year because let’s face it, there’s a hella lot of stuff going on between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Trees to trim, lights to string, cookies to bake (erm, I think I missed that on my list), cards to send (damn, another thing I forgot on my list), gifts to buy (ugh), families to gather, you get the picture.

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

I’ve had a lot of excuses to put my writing on pause over the past year or so (hey, legit struggles with the plot, y’all). I finally took a writing class to counter my procrastination, and it worked! I even managed to hack out 50k words (added up across multiple projects) during NaNo.

But now what? How do I keep up the momentum I built during NaNoWriMo? That’s the whole reason I do NaNo to begin with. Now with the annual holiday slump that seems to get worse every year, I struggle to make progress.

Wait! That’s it! The cure for the holiday slump, which in some circles is called “being a Grinch”, and in other circles is called “bah, Humbug!” Heh, let me try this out:

Sorry I didn’t get a gift for the exchange (the gifts-in-a-pile-then-random-selection game), I was working on the climax for Book 2.

Not bad. Here’s another one: Oh, sorry, I didn’t have time to make cookies this year. I had to write the big reveal for Book 2.

Hmm. I kinda like this. I could go places with this: Hey, I know I was supposed to bring the figgy pudding and mulled cider for the family Christmas, but my characters said if I didn’t get their big conflict scene written, they were going to stop talking to me for their New Year’s resolution. 😀

I’ve had it wrong all this time! Brilliant! Good thing the kids are in college so they won’t be so bummed when they realize I didn’t get them anything this year.

Despite the hustle and bustle of the season (wasn’t that part of a Christmas song?), give a bit of attention to your writing. Hey, what could be more theraputic than writing a little revenge short story starring Great-aunt Edith and her blood-red lipstick (that you still haven’t gotten out of last year’s cashmire sweater), or the stench of the perfume she bathes in? What about Great-uncle Horace who hasn’t cleaned his dentures for, yeesh, that long.

Next week is the solstice! Yippee! Finally, the days start getting longer. After that, I’ll be taking a break until after the new year.

As Dory would say:

And of course, can’t forget Zoey …


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Holly-Dazed

Well, it’s here. The festive times. The travel-to-see-family times. The let’s-drive-around-and-look-at-the-lights times (my favorite!). More excuses to procrastinate on my latest project are here!

I made my jelly.jelly-2016 I baked my cookies. I even got my Christmas shopping done. Now I’ve got three days of family stuff to do: the whole Christmas at the in-laws, then Christmas with my siblings, then a day to rest and clean (eek!) before my son’s girlfriend comes to visit.

Hoo-boy.

And still the details on my latest WIP are hovering at the back of my mind like a swarm of gnats. And I’m getting grumpy because I’m not writing.

I tried. Really, I did. But I’m not connecting with the story. It’s really hard to write when you don’t or can’t connect with the story or the characters. I’ve revised the plot again, I’ve reviewed the characters, I’ve solidified the underlying mystery in my head and on paper. It’s terribly frustrating to write when that visceral connection to the story just isn’t happening.

It’s like I’m in a daze.

A holly daze.

Should I even try to keep going with this story? Should I set it aside and work on my fantasy? Should I start on a “next in the series” story with the characters from my other book? Should I just not worry about it and take some more time off from writing?

“No.” The door to my writing office sweeps open and then slams shut as my Muse enters like a force of Nature. He storms across the office, grabs at a shadow in a corner, and yanks a Dementor-like shade into the light. The tendons in the back of his hand and his bare forearm stand against his skin as he squeezes.

My writer’s doubt fades into smoke and vanishes.

Then he turns to me, blue eyes vibrant.

Uh-oh.

He’s got the whole Indiana Jones thing going on–wait, no fedora or bullwhip, just faded jeans and that burgundy henley shirt I love, sleeves shoved to his elbows. Add in a Harrison Ford-esque scowl, and that pretty much sums it up.

“What?” I ask, even though I think I know.

“Really, love? You have to ask?” He shakes his head and plants his hands on his hips. “You did see your writer’s doubt, didn’t you?”

“Not until you did that.” I gesture to the corner. “Where have you been?”

Now he shuffles his feet and rubs the back of his neck. “Extended pub crawl.”

“With Mr. E, right? Hey, I get it. Mae’s second Point Pleasant book just came out, and she finished the third. I expected you two to whoop it up. So don’t come steamrolling in here when I think about taking–”

“A break? Seriously? You’ve been ‘taking a break'”–he makes air quotes–“for the past few weeks. You’re done taking a break.”

His Australian accent gets thicker when he’s chewing me out. Don’t tell him, but I have a soft spot for Aussie accents. Not that I get him fired up on purpose.

Mostly.

“Actually, I’ve been waiting for you to get back.” I cross my arms and lean back against the desk. “Do I keep going with my latest WIP, start a new story with Sierra and Quinn, or pull out my fantasy and finish that?”

He stares at me with a look that either means he can’t believe I’m even considering my fantasy or he can’t believe I’m actually asking his opinion.

He mirrors me, crossing his arms on his broad chest. “Have you heard back about your R&R?”

“Not yet. I was hoping I’d hear before Christmas, but maybe she just does things in two-month chunks, in which case I won’t hear back until mid-January. She’s spent some time on the phone with me, so I’m optimistic, but I feel like there would be a lot of interest in that book. I’m thinking about kicking off some queries after the first of the year if I don’t hear from her.”

He narrows his eyes. I feel like a kid who thought she did something good but now isn’t sure. “What do you want to work on, love?”

“That’s the problem. I don’t know. Part of me wants to work with Sierra and Quinn again, but part of me knows I should work on my latest WIP, except I can’t focus on it. It’s like the story needs so much TLC since I dissected it that I don’t want to bother.”

“No fantasy?”

“That’s my fallback if I can’t decide between the others.”

“You don’t think that trying to re-revise for the third time is a problem? Start from scratch, love. Same story, but don’t try to take what you’ve already written. You started fresh with your contemporary fantasy, and it turned out nicely.”

“Still needs lots of work.” This isn’t helping at all. “I don’t want to start from scratch. Everything’s there, I just have to reassemble it.”

“You just have to write. Write some short stories. Write a novella like your writing teacher suggested. Hell, write up a bunch of blog posts ahead of time.” He rests his hands on my shoulders and squeezes. “Write something, love. Anything. Just do it.” A fedora appears on his head. He settles behind my desk with a coiled bullwhip in hand. “No excuses.”

Er, o-kay. Maybe I’ll flip a coin. Maybe I’ll meditate on it.

In any case, may the holidays find you and yours safe, sane, and full of cheer. 😀

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!